Top Ten Signs of Poor Customer Service

Here it is – The Top Ten Signs of Poor Customer Service!

Drum roll please.

Number 10

An Us vs Them Mindset. This person thinks that Customers are out to get him or her. They feel the customer decided to wake up that day and "mess with me for no reason." This also includes the "Poor me" and the "I hate my _____" (insert job, life, spouse, etc) person who feels that everyone is out to get them.

Number 9

Poorly trained staff. Yep. It seems to be everywhere. And I hear the same things all the time. "I do not have time to train" or "I train them and they quit" or "I want to try them out for awhile before I train them." These are poor excuses. Heck, I've even used the "try for awhile" one myself. You know what? There is no excuse for poorly trained staff. If you are the person responsible, you need to take a look at your paycheck. It represents payment for services rendered as a Professional! Not an amateur.

Number 8

Stiff, forced or awkward answers. When they speak it sounds like a teenager trying to explain why they came home late. ("Uhhh, you will not believe it man.") This is a lack of confidence in the product, poor training (see above), lack of skill or lack of aptitude. You can fix the confidence by learning the product, fix the skills with practice (role play, scripting) and conduct ongoing training. You can not fix the aptitude. There are some people who do not have the inner social, educational or people skills needed to work in the field of Customer Service.

Number 7

Uncommitted to the field of Customer Service or to the Customer. Very obviously especially when you ask them how long have they been there and they say something like "3 years" and yet the skill set they have belongs to a "day one never been in Customer Service" employee. That tells you something about them. I mean, you gotta figure they have about as much interest in becoming professional Customer Service people as a fish learning to fly. If they have not asked about training, company plans and their role in the big picture, they are telling you one of two things.

1. The place you work is sending a signal that everyone will work here will never progress beyond where they are now, so why bother.

2. They do not care to invest in themselves to become better at what they do.

And not committing themselves to the Customer by working to resolve situations is a big signal as well. These people throw their hands up at the first sign of trouble and say things like "I can not deal with this person" or "Why is everyone rude?" Some reasons for this behavior could be they feel as if they do not have the support or tools necessary, or they do not see the results that they expected from previous situations.

Number 6

Personnel are not Customer focused. They are instead focused on preservation. They want to preserve their status, position, seniority, etc. They very rarely extend themselves or reach out to customers.
It is a naturally occurring growth. Unfortunately, it's a cancerous growth. And you may need to remove it. Help them see that by continuing to perform in this manner that they are actually limiting them and not keeping anything. In fact, when there are rough waters, these are the first people you jettison as "dead weight."

Number 5

Customers have to ask for action to take place. It's called cattle prod Customer Service. They have to prod the personnel to get any action. And even then, may not get anything at all. In fact, they could possibly start a stampede! Anytime your customers are pushing your staff to get something done, something is wrong. And it's not the Customer!

Number 4

Frequent interruptions. Telephones, other employees, customer after customer, too many duties, not enough time, oh there are so many causes of interruptions. It is a symptom of our times. Just because computers and email and texting work fast, with no complaints, we expect our Customer Service to be the same way. Folks, it just is not so. No matter how many computers you have that hum, phones that ring and texting that flashes, if you do not have the human element in place, it's not going to work.
People need the human touch. It's that little warm feeling that comes from interacting with someone face to face.
What I am really trying to say is this.

HAVE ENOUGH STAFF! Not just enough, I mean enough.
Enough means no extra waiting, no wandering Customers, no standing in extra long lines, no "can not answer that question because I do not have time" and many other examples of being understaffed or "just enough" staff. Then have the processes and systems in place to back up your staff. And train them.

Number 3

In tense situations we raise our voices, flail our arms sometimes and generally have an effect on an entire area. Not moving the parties involved to another area is a sign of poor Customer Service. People know when something is not quite right. We sense it. It spreads from person to person without the need for speaking. It is obvious when we see it. In many cases, we feel there is a need to "stand your ground" with the Customer. Does that include include doing it at the front counter, reception area, parking lot, etc …? Why not move the Customer and you to an area that has some semblance of privacy and you can then air out your differences? It would definitely improve your image and other Customers perceptions.

Number 2

Unhappy people. That's right, unhappy people in your Customer Service department. They are there. And for whatever reason they are unhappy. Spouse, family situations, medical, you name it. And it bleeds over into their performance and to your Customer. If you are unhappy, do something about it. Talk to someone, get help! We already know you are unhappy! Let's work this out together so that we can conduct our business as Professionals! If you are unhappy because you are in Customer Service, then get out of it. Find a career you can be happy in. We'll manage without you. (In some cases, way better without you)

Number 1

Poor Attitude. What can I say? It's an internal thing. You can not fix it from the outside. People have to see it for themselves, change it for themselves. You wish you could push their attitude adjustment button; it just does not work that way.

If you are the person with the poor attitude, then do something about it. The rest of us are tired of it.

There they are! The Top Ten! If any of these fit you, your department or your life, Get After It!

Top 10 Advantages and Benefits of Electronic Appointment Reminders

The emergence of electronic appointment reminders via text messaging and the Internet has given doctors a new avenue for accommodating their patients. This kind of service benefits not only the doctor and the doctor’s medical staff, but the patients as well.

Considering all the different features of automated appointment reminder programs and services, the following have been deemed the most important advantages of this technology:

1. Adherence to Appointments

The likelihood that a patient will keep the appointment is higher when he or she receives an alert through SMS, electronic mail, and voice calls. Because they are informed of the date, time and the name of the doctor, there is little chance that they will miss the schedule or be late for it. On their end, doctors can also use appointment reminder software to keep track of their meetings with colleagues or consultation schedules with patients.

2. Reduction in Wait Times

Patients who know what time they should come in for clinical visits do not have to wait in line for their consultation. As a business, clinics can take advantage of this technology as a form of customer service strategy. The more satisfied their patients are, the more likely they will return to seek medical assistance.

3. Potential for Revenue Growth

The numerous benefits that an automated reminder can provide to patients guarantees quality customer service and can translate into higher revenue from repeated consultations and treatments.

4. Multiple Communication Portals

E-mail reminders are ideal for patients who have regular access to the Internet, or those who use their e-mails as part of their work. Voice calls are most beneficial to older people, who spend less time online and know less about mobile phones. SMS text messaging is perhaps the most effective patient appointment reminder, as it sends the message directly to the device of the person involved in the appointment. Doctors and their staff can use any or all of these options to help patients remember their schedule.

5. Compliance with Electronic Records Rules and Trends

In the United States and a growing number of countries around the world, the public and private health sectors are switching to a paperless system of record-keeping. Appointment reminders are often part of web-based offerings that help organize and store patient information. These programs are ideally compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act under U.S. health care law, which means they are considered part of the treatment covered by insurance.

6. Customer Service Features

Many automated reminder services are available in multiple languages to cater to patients of different nationalities. Patients can also respond to the reminder by confirming or canceling the appointment upon receiving the call. In addition, they may have a function that lets the patient opt out of the reminder service.

7. Physician-Friendly Features

Doctors can customize the files according to specialization so that the scheduling and reminding of patients’ appointments are more organized. They can also attach additional notes to the reminder call or message. A lot of programs offer unlimited text message reminders.

8. Cost-Effectiveness

Although appointment reminder tools may appear to add costs to a medical establishment, it can actually save clinics money in some ways. Since the calls are automated, physicians do not need to hire additional staff to contact the patients for their upcoming visit. Administrative staff can be assigned to do other tasks instead of organizing patient appointments.

9. Data Security

These programs come with solid security features that ensure confidentiality of patient information. They also have maintenance functions that allow for daily database backups and lower the risk of misuse of data.

10. Accommodation of Multiple Customers

Automated reminder programs can handle simultaneous calls, e-mails and SMS messages to a multiple number of patients. This saves time, money and avoids the inconvenience of making the patient wait.

10 Facts About Motorola

Motorola was founded by Paul and Joseph Galvin and produced one of the first commercially successful car radios in 1930. Today it is a Fortune 100 telecommunications company with an annual turnover of over 22 billion dollars.

  1. Martin Cooper was a project manager for Motorola and invented the world's first cellular mobile phone back in 1973, weighing in at almost 800 grams it is a cry from today's small and sleek handsets. However the first commercially launched handset called the Motorola Dyna-Tac was not made available to consumers until 1984
  2. The Second World War led to many innovations but one of the most useful and iconic was a mobile two-way transceiver or "Walkie Talkie" which was invented by Motorola in 1940. This particular model was called the SCR-300 and was a hefty back mounted device. It was not until a year later that the company mass produced a smaller handheld unit which they called the "Handie Talkie" or SCR-536
  3. Pagers were very popular during the 90s, but Motorola actually made the first one in 1956 which was used in hospitals to send radio messages to specific individuals
  4. Motorola also made the first cordless large screen portable television. This TV had a 19 inch screen size
  5. The company not only invented communication devices which were used on Earth, but also made the radio used by Neil Armstrong to utter the now legendary words "one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind" back in 1969 on the Apollo 11 lunar module
  6. High definition television is very popular now but a subsidiary of Motorola called General Instrument Corporation actually proposed and launched the world's first HDTV television all the way back in 1990
  7. In 1999 the company made the iDEN i1000 plus handset, which was the first smartphone to incorporated web browsing capability, email and alphanumeric messaging.
  8. Motorola's car radios were initially sold to Police departments across America. By 1937 further communication advances enabled them to launch a two-way version which allowed Police to communicate whilst on patrol
  9. The founding company of Motorola was called Galvin Manufacturing Corporation, which was incorporated on September 25th 1928 in Chicago, Illinois. It was not until 1947 that the company previously changed its name to Motorola
  10. In 1998, Motorola was overtaken by Nokia as the world's largest seller of mobile phone handsets

All About ASAP, FYI and FYA

ONE day, a collegeague turned to me and asked, "What's FYI?"

"For your information."

"What's FYA?"

"For your action."

"What's WRT? "

"With reference to …"

Before the conversation dragged on any further, I quickly looked up a website on acronyms used in business communications and sent it to him via e-mail.

This conversation made me realize that the full meaning of many acronyms and abbreviations may not be immediately obvious for many people – students or working adults alike.

For starters, an acronym is a word created from combining the initial letters of each word. For example, For your action.

An abbreviation is a word shortened from its original form. For example, "Attn." is an abbreviation of the word "attention" to convey the meaning "for the attention of".

In general, a full stop is used for abbreviations where the last letter of the word and the abbreviation are not the same. For example, "Co." (Company) needs a full stop but "Ltd" (Limited) does not. Acronyms do not need punctuation marks.

Below are some frequently used short forms in business communication like e-mails, faxes and letters:

aka . – also known as

On Monday morning, Kay El, aka The Boss, walked in happily and blessed her assistant, Pee Jay.

approx. – approx

Checking her e-mail, Pee Jay read, "Today is the boss's birthday. Can everyone please slip off quietly to the cafeteria in approx. 15 minutes?"

ASAP – as soon as possible

Pee Jay opened up her daily planner and scribbled ASAP next to some of the urgent items on her to-do list.

Attn . – for the attention of

Leafing through the stack of mail to be sent out, Pee Jay asked her boss, "To what should I address the cheque for the annual report?"

Her boss replied, "Just write 'Attn: Ms. Christine Jalleh." She'll know what to do with it. "

Bcc . – blind carbon copy or blind copy to. In this case, the carbon copy is sent to an e-mail recipient which e-mail address is not visible to the cc or other bcc recipients.

"By the way, I think it's better if you bcc me in your e-mail to Brown. We would not want him thinking that I'm supervising you for this project."

Cc . – carbon copy, or copy to

"But I would like to be cc-ed on the e-mail to Mr Green as I have not yet introduced the two of you to each other."

c / o – in care of, used when sending a document to A who will receive it on B's because because B is away from the office.

"Boss, I think Christine is back in China this week. Would it be all right if I sent the cheque in care of her assistant? I'll still write her name on top with c / o Ah Sis Tern below."

COD – cash on delivery, where a person makes payment for an item purchase after it has been delivered.

"I'm also sending out the cheque for the set of Business English reference books we bought COD on eBay."

eg . – exempli gratia (for example)

Pee Jay replied to the e-mail, "Hi everyone. Please remember that the boss does not like surprises, eg everyone shouting 'Surprise!' in the cafeteria. "

et al. – et alii (and others). Usually used to list co-authors after the lead author in a bibliography, this form is now commonly used to address the other people other than the recipient in e-mails.

She received a new e-mail, which read, "Dear Pee Jay et al., I was reminded that the boss does NOT like surprises …"

etc. – et cetera (and so on OR and so forth)

This means that we will not be able to collectively surprise her by springing out of the cafeteria doors as we had planned, etc.

exc. – except

"Can everyone, exc. Pee Jay, be at the cafeteria in 5 minutes? We need to figure out a surprise without the surprise element.

FYI – for your information

Her boss's voice bought the young assistant back to the present, "Pee Jay, I'm forwarding you all these e-mails FYI, okay?"

FYA – for your action

"Note that some of these e-mails are FYA …"

ie . – id est (that is)

After acknowledging her supervisor, Pee Jay decided to help her collections out and typed, "She's in a good mood today, ie we will be a new account and completed a major project."

K – thousand, eg 450K = 450,000

"Just to give you an idea of ​​her mood, it's a 450K retainer for the first quarter …"

PA – personal assistant

The immediate reply to Pee Jay's e-mail read, "Thanks for the info, Pee Jay – you're the best PA!"

pa – per annual (per year)

Pee Jay smiled and responded, "Haha, there is a reason why I'm paid RM65K pa"

pp – per pro (used when signing a document on someone's behalf)

Looking back at her paperwork, Pee Jay signed some invoices on her boss's behalf, inserting pp just before her signature.

Pto. – please turn over, used at the end of a page to indicate that there is a continuity to the text.

"By the way, please remember to type Pto. On the first page of the proposal you're sending.

viz . – videlicet, namely

She got up and left a note on Pee Jay's work station before leaving. Scribbled on it was, "Can I pass you my slice of birthday cake after I cut it? I really do not need a lot of carbo, viz. Refined flour, at my age." The note ended with a wink.

Readers can go to http://www.acronymfinder.com/ to search for the meanings of over 4 million acronyms and abbreviations. This online dictionary also allows users to filter their search according to categories like information technology (IT), military and government, business and finance, science and medicine, organizations and schools, and slang and pop culture.